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The Power to Control Diabetes is in Your Hands Community Outreach Kit

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The Power to Control Diabetes is in Your Hands Community Outreach Kit

This resource kit provides information about diabetes in older adults and suggests how to promote the Power to Control campaign through educational activities, media events, and promotional campaigns.

Last reviewed: 01/01/2009


Introduction to The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands Community Outreach Kit

Introduction

In recent years, the number of people in the United States with diabetes has more than doubled. Almost 24 million people, or about 8 percent of the population, currently have diabetes. Considered by many as the epidemic of our time, the number of Americans with diabetes is expected to double again by 2050. There is no question that every community needs to take action to help prevent this epidemic from spreading. Americans of all ages, races, and ethnic groups are vulnerable, and it is especially a topic of concern for older adults. Diabetes is most common in people age 60 and older—more than 12 million adults age 60 and older have diabetes.

About the Campaign

The answer to controlling this silent killer lies in awareness, education, early diagnosis, and proper treatment. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP)—a joint program of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—has created The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands, an awareness campaign to help older adults with diabetes and their loved ones learn how to manage the disease and live longer, healthier lives. The outreach effort focuses on the importance of promoting a comprehensive approach to controlling diabetes by managing blood glucose (blood sugar), blood pressure, and cholesterol; taking prescribed medications; making healthy food choices; and engaging in regular physical activity. The campaign also provides important information about Medicare benefits available to people with diabetes.

About the Kit

This resource kit provides information about diabetes in older adults and suggests how to promote the Power to Control campaign in your community through educational activities and promotional events. Kit materials will help you convey to your organization or community the importance of comprehensive diabetes control and the fact that diabetes can be managed. The kit also contains information about the many Medicare benefits available to older adults with diabetes. It is especially important that older adults in your community understand what diabetes Medicare benefits are offered.

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Kit Materials

Getting Started

You can play an important role in combating this deadly disease. Help promote the message of The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands campaign by using the ideas in this online kit in your community. Promotional ideas are included for a variety of different audiences and environments – patients, health care professionals, educators, senior citizen centers, local media, libraries, community organizations, retailers, and more.

To begin, review each section of the online kit. Each section has specific action steps to help you spread the word about comprehensive diabetes control to your community. The kit’s resources will provide you with information about diabetes and older adults and suggestions for educational activities, media events, and promotional campaigns. Review all of the different suggestions, and choose ideas and activities that will work best for your audience.

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Questions to Consider

After you have reviewed the kit, think about your own individual community and the strengths of your organization and the community as a whole:

  • Identify your target audience. How is your community represented? Are there groups of African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander older adults living with diabetes in your community? If so, consider focusing some elements of your promotional activities on these specific community members.
  • Identify needs. What are the specific health needs of your community? Do you have a large population of older adults with diabetes?
  • Identify existing programs. Are there existing diabetes programs in place in your community? If so, how can you work with these programs?
  • Identify existing resources. What organizational resources can you utilize? Are there experienced public speakers in your group? Perhaps a health care professional could speak to a group of older adults about diabetes and distribute NDEP materials. Does your organization have a newsletter, email listserv, website, or contribute to a professional journal? If so, distribute NDEP’s feature articles to stress the importance of a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes.
  • Evaluate your community. Are there other organizations, businesses, or groups that you can partner with to address diabetes and related issues? Are there pharmacies or nearby libraries that could sponsor a workshop with a diabetes educator, dietitian, or nurse? A diabetes educator provides the tools, training, and support necessary to help people with diabetes change their behavior and accomplish their diabetes self-management goals. To find a diabetes educator in your community, contact the American Association of Diabetes Educators.
  • Evaluate your organization. Does your organization have monthly events? If so, use the “Sample Diabetes Awareness Promotion Activities”section to pick a monthly activity and incorporate Power to Controlmessages and activities.

More NDEP Resources

NDEP has developed many free educational messages and resources—including this kit—that you can use as is, or adapt and tailor to meet the needs of your own community. All information may be downloaded, reproduced, and distributed without copyright restrictions. You can add your own organization’s logo, disseminate information to media, coordinate education activities, and share resources with other partner organizations. For more information about NDEP and its free diabetes education materials, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337). You can also sign-up for NDEP’s monthly e-newsletter, News & Notes to receive regular updates.

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An Overview of the National Diabetes Education Program

Founded in 1997, the National Diabetes Education Program is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that involves public and private partners in efforts to improve the treatment and outcomes for people with diabetes, promote early diagnosis, and prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. Find out more about NDEP and how it works:

Contact NDEP
To order free diabetes materials, call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) or click www.YourDiabetesInfo.org.

NDEP Fact Sheet
Learn more about what NDEP is doing to change the way diabetes is treated.

NDEP Publications Catalog
NDEP offers a wide range of copyright-free resources that can be used to reach out to people with diabetes, people at risk, and health care professionals. Consumer materials are tailored for groups at high risk for diabetes—older adults, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and women with a history of gestational diabetes and their children. Order or download free materials in English, Spanish, and 15 Asian and Pacific Islander languages. NDEP also has an online Spanish-language publications catalog.

NDEP News & Notes
Get the latest news about NDEP by signing up to receive a monthly e-newsletter.

NDEP Progress Report
Learn more about NDEP’s campaigns, messages, and materials.

NDEP Strategic Directions for 2011, 2012 and 2013
Discover how NDEP and its partners will implement strategies on future directions and priority activities.

NDEP Publications Order Form
Make copies of this form to hand out at events or programs.

State-Based Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs
Find out more about State Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs and how you can partner with their activities in your area.

Practice Transformation for Physicians and Health Care TeamsDesigned for health care professionals, this NDEP website includes information and tools to make effective systems changes in the way diabetes is diagnosed, treated, and prevented.

www.DiabetesAtWork.org
Devoted to easing the burden of diabetes in the workplace, this NDEP website features resources offering the latest trends in disease management, worksite wellness strategies, and a host of other interactive tools for on-the-job diabetes management.

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The Facts about Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that blood glucose (often called blood sugar) is too high. When blood glucose stays high, it can cause serious complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems. Learn more about how people with diabetes can manage their disease and prevent or delay its complications in the materials listed below.

What Is Diabetes?
Learn about the different types of diabetes, including their causes, risk factors, symptoms, and complications.

Managing Diabetes
Diabetes is serious, but it can be managed. Order or download free diabetes control materials.

Preventing Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented in people at risk, including older adults. Order or download free diabetes prevention materials.

National Diabetes Statistics
Review the latest diabetes prevalence data, released by the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control.

Diabetes Snapshot Fact Sheet
Use this fact sheet as a quick reference for key diabetes statistics.

Diabetes At-a-Glance
Learn about new statistics, including why almost 25 percent of the U.S. population is affected by diabetes.

Diabetes Data & Trends
Find resources documenting the state-by-state public health burden of diabetes and its complications in the United States. For statistical information on the aging population, including information on dietary quality, obesity, and physical activity, visit www.agingstats.gov.

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Medicare Benefits for People with Diabetes

What is Medicare?

Medicare is health insurance for people age 65 or older, under age 65 with certain disabilities, and any age with end-stage renal disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant). People with diabetes who are eligible for Medicare can get the most from their Medicare benefits by learning about the types of services that are available. People with diabetes are encouraged to ask their health care team about the benefits they qualify for and visit www.medicare.gov to get specific details from Medicare.

What Benefits Does Medicare Offer for People with Diabetes?

People with diabetes enrolled in Medicare may be covered for all or part of the cost for:

  • A “Welcome to Medicare” physical exam when they enroll
  • A1C testing
  • Cholesterol testing
  • Diabetes self-management training to learn how to manage diabetes
  • Medical nutrition therapy: nutrition and lifestyle assessments, diet management information, and nutrition counseling
  • Diabetes equipment and supplies for self-monitoring of blood glucose, including special equipment for persons with low vision
  • Foot exams by podiatrist or foot care specialist if medically necessary
  • Therapeutic shoes and inserts if medically necessary
  • A dilated eye exam and glaucoma screening
  • Flu and pneumonia shots
  • Insulin pumps
  • Diabetes medications

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What Benefits Does Medicare Offer for People At Risk for Diabetes?

People enrolled in Medicare who are at risk for type 2 diabetes may be covered for all or part of the cost for:

  • A “Welcome to Medicare” physical exam when they enroll
  • Yearly diabetes screening for people who are at risk for diabetes and twice yearly screening for people diagnosed with prediabetes (people are considered at risk if they have any of the following: high blood pressure, history of abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels, obesity, or a history of high blood glucose)
  • Cholesterol screening – every five years

Medicare Contact Information

To learn more about specific Medicare coverage, contact:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), available in English and Spanish
1-877-486-2048 for TTY users
1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477) to report Medicare fraud and abuse
www.medicare.gov

For more information, read the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Medicare & You 2009 and Medicare Coverage of Diabetes Supplies and Services. Medicare also has a free online resource, www.medicare.gov/caregivers/, to help Medicare applicants and beneficiaries navigate the government claims system.

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Calendar of Promotional Activities

There are countless opportunities to share diabetes information with members of your community. One way to get your information to the public is by utilizing “news hooks”—messages associated with current newsworthy events, holidays, or other observances that will likely be covered by media. For example, you could encourage your organization and other organizations, businesses, or groups to include information for older adults with diabetes, their loved ones, and caregivers in programs, activities, or on websites in association with holidays and observances. You could also arrange to have a guest speaker provide diabetes information to older adults during a group meeting or program, or ask libraries, senior centers, recreation centers, and other appropriate gathering places to display posters and distribute brochures.

NDEP has copyright-free campaign tools for you to use in your community and encourages you to reproduce and distribute them to local media and other community channels. Add your organization’s logo to let everyone know you support these messages. For more tools to help with promotional efforts, including numerous sample feature articles, visit NDEP’s “Campaign Tools” webpage.

It also helps to use a yearly or monthly calendar when planning various promotional activities. The following list includes example observances for each month, a diabetes-related “news hook,” a suggestion for a promotion you can undertake in association with that observance, and links to additional resources. Use your imagination and understanding of your community to create opportunities to share the importance of diabetes self-management. For more ideas, visit www.healthfinder.gov/nho, or subscribe to NDEP’s News & Notes e-newsletter to find out NDEP’s latest promotional activities and materials. Remember to refer people to www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) for free diabetes information.

January – New Year’s Resolutions

Sample News Hook:

  • Make this the year you control your diabetes.

Sample Promotions:

  • Senior centers, churches, and synagogues, as well as organizations and retailers who work with older adults, can include information about diabetes self-management and benefit information for Medicare recipients who have diabetes in their publications. Include the NDEP website (www.YourDiabetesInfo.org) and phone number (1-888-693-NDEP) as an additional resource.
  • Ask organizations hosting meetings or activities in January to feature a speaker or provide information on diabetes and older adults for participants during their event. Or, compile a list of “New Year’s Resolutions” that older adults with diabetes could make to improve their health and share this list at a relevant organization’s meeting. Distribute copies of NDEP’s Tips for Feeling Better and Staying Healthy tip sheet at the meeting or feature the tip sheet in your organization’s newsletter or on its website.

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February – Black History Month & American Heart Month

Sample News Hook:

  • Diabetes disproportionately affects the African American community; African Americans are almost twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites.
  • Heart disease is the number one cause of early death among people with diabetes. But there’s hope. People with diabetes can learn to manage their diabetes – and cut their risk for heart attack and stroke by more than half.

Sample Promotions:

  • Target local African American print publications and suggest a feature story on diabetes and older adults. Offer them the opportunity to interview one of your community partners, such as a local diabetes educator, about the topic. Also remember to contact specialty publications, such as those issued by religious and social service organizations.
  • Hold an activity or workshop for older African Americans that promotes comprehensive diabetes control and cardiovascular disease prevention. Pass out copies of 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes. For Life. to participants.
  • Print cards for Valentine’s Day and include a special message about the ABCs of diabetes (as measured by the A1C test, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) for loved ones who have the disease. List www.YourDiabetesInfo.org as a resource for more information about the ABCs of diabetes.

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March – American Diabetes Alert Day® & National Kidney Month

Sample News Hook:

  • More than 6 million Americans with diabetes do not know they have the disease.
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease; if left untreated, kidney disease can lead to kidney failure.

Sample Promotions:

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April – National Public Health Week, World Health Day, & National Minority Health Month

Sample News Hook:

  • National Public Health Week and World Health Day have different themes each year, and local groups are encouraged to hold relevant events. Try to fit a message related to diabetes and older adults into each year’s theme.
  • African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes and are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes.

Sample Promotions:

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May – Older Americans Month, National Sight-Saving Month, National High Blood Pressure Education Month, & Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Sample News Hook:

  • Millions of Americans have diabetes, and people age 60 and older are more commonly affected than younger people.
  • Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye disease for people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness in American adults.
  • Complications from diabetes can develop much more quickly if blood pressure is higher than recommended levels.
  • Diabetes is disproportionately affecting Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

Sample Promotions:

  • Locate an older adult in your community who is living a productive and active life with diabetes, and write a letter describing this person’s healthy lifestyle to the assignment editor of your local television and radio stations and to the features editor of your community newspapers. Ask them to write a feature story about this person or interview them for an upcoming article. Mention that NDEP has free tips to help loved ones of people with diabetes and cite NDEP’s Tips for Helping a Person with Diabetes as a reference.
  • Research if your local mall has a mall-walkers program for senior citizens. If it does, encourage senior citizens in your community to participate. If not, start a mall-walking program of your own!
  • Contact a local television news show or community service program to see if a representative of your organization could discuss how you are promoting the importance of diabetes self-management and the availability of benefits for people with Medicare to older adults in your community. Mention www.YourDiabetesInfo.org so that viewers can get additional free information.
  • Blindness can be a complication of diabetes. Team up with a local chapter of the National Federation of the Blind or National Eye Health Education Program to create an easy-to-use resource such as a tip sheet to help older adults with diabetes care for their eyes. Or, contact a local Lions Club to find out how you can help with blindness prevention activities in your community, such as vision screenings or Lions Strides walks.
  • Contact your local senior center, grocery store, or pharmacy chain about having a health care professional come to test the blood pressure of older adults. Hand out copies of NDEP’s If You Have Diabetes, Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers to those who attend.
  • If your community has an Asian American and/or Pacific Islander older adult population, develop a feature article on the incidence of diabetes among older Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, plus what this population needs to know about managing diabetes. Mention NDEP’s 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes. For Life. Asian and Pacific Islander adaptations.

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June – National Men’s Health Week

Sample News Hook:

  • Men with diabetes and their families can face devastating complications from diabetes since people with diabetes are at a high risk for heart attack and stroke, blindness, kidney disease, loss of a toe or foot, and erectile dysfunction. But there is good news—taking good care of yourself and your diabetes can help you avoid long-term problems and live a long and healthy life.

Sample Promotions:

  • Offer to write a feature story for local publications about the importance of regular physical activity in older men with diabetes, or use one of NDEP’s copyright-free feature articles. Begin by mentioning the observance of National Men’s Health Week, and then give examples of safe places to walk, such as indoor or outdoor walking paths, a shopping mall, or a community center. Explain that physical activity can improve strength, flexibility, and balance. Give tips like “Find an activity you enjoy—brisk walking is a great way to be active.” NDEP’s It’s Not Too Late to Prevent Diabetes. Take Your First Step Today has great physical activity tips for older adults, regardless of whether they are trying to prevent or manage diabetes.

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July – Summer Vacations & Family Reunions

Sample News Hook:

  • Summertime fun and travel go hand-in-hand with comprehensive diabetes control.

Sample Promotions:

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August – National Senior Citizens Day

Sample News Hook:

  • Self-management is an important component of any successful diabetes management plan.

Sample Promotions;

  • Send a press release to health editors at your local newspapers and television and radio stations, informing them of the services Medicare covers for people with diabetes including diabetes self-management training (which includes a section on nutrition) and medical nutrition therapy services. Mention NDEP’s The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands brochure as a resource.
  • Issue a media advisory with a diabetes fact sheet, and enlist the help of experts to discuss diabetes and older adults and to demonstrate how to test and manage blood glucose.
  • Download NDEP’s resources for older adults online at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org, make copies, and hand them out to members of your local senior center. Give a presentation on diabetes management. For a sample slide presentation and talking points, visit Power to Control Campaign Resources.

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September – National Hispanic Heritage Month, National Cholesterol Education Month, & Take A Loved One for a Checkup Day

Sample News Hook:

  • Hispanics/Latinos are almost twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites.
  • Managing cholesterol is part of the ABCs of diabetes (as measured by the A1C test, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol).
  • Taking older loved ones to see a health care professional may be the first step in helping them learn to manage their diabetes.

Sample Promotions:

  • Target Hispanic/Latino media with a feature story on the incidence of diabetes among Hispanics/Latinos and the importance of diabetes self-management. Refer editors and journalists to NDEP’s Spanish URL, www.diabetesinformacion.org, and Spanish-language publications. Let them know that their readers can download or order free copies of NDEP’s bilingual diabetes control resources for Hispanics/Latinos.
  • Contact your local community newspapers and ask them to consider writing an article about the ABCs of managing diabetes. A is for the A1C test, B is for blood pressure, and C is for cholesterol. LDL, or bad cholesterol, builds up and clogs your arteries. People with diabetes should have their cholesterol checked at least once a year. The LDL goal for most people is less than 100. Visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org for more information.
  • Encourage your friends to take their older family members to see a health care professional to learn what steps they can take to manage their diabetes. Ask your loved one’s health care professional to display NDEP’s free diabetes materials in the waiting room or at the front desk for others.

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October – National Pharmacy Week & Family Health Month

Sample News Hook:

  • Spotlight the challenges family members and friends face when caring for older adults with diabetes.
  • Family members play an integral role in helping older adults with diabetes learn how to manage their condition.

Sample Promotions:

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November – National Diabetes Awareness Month & National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

Sample News Hook:

  • Bring attention to the 10.3 million people (or 20.9 percent of all people in this age group) over age 60 living with diabetes during National Diabetes Awareness Month.
  • Diabetes is disproportionately affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives – 15 percent of American Indian and Alaska Native adults aged 20 years or older have diabetes.

Sample Promotions:

  • Ask the mayor or town council to sign a proclamation observing National Diabetes Month in your community. Hold a signing ceremony, and invite local media. Hold a news conference following the ceremony and include information about diabetes self-management and Medicare benefits for people with diabetes. Bring a laptop computer to showcase www.YourDiabetesInfo.org and NDEP’s free resources.
  • Within your organization, highlight a different issue that affects older adults with diabetes each week during National Diabetes Month. For example, during the first week host a work-site lunch seminar about the facts of diabetes. During the second week, highlight steps people can take to manage the ABCs of diabetes. The next week, invite a local health care professional to come talk about diabetes self-management.
  • If your community has an American Indian and/or Alaska Native older adult population, develop a feature story on the incidence of diabetes among older American Indians and Alaska Natives, plus what this population needs to know about managing diabetes. Mention NDEP’s Take Care of Your Heart. Manage Your Diabetes. tip sheet for American Indians and Alaska Natives as a resource.

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December – Holiday Gift Giving

Sample News Hook:

  • Give your family and yourself a gift that will last a lifetime—good health.

Sample Promotions:

  • Write a press release about the importance of diabetes self-management and the availability of benefits for people with Medicare who have diabetes. Use the theme of giving your family and yourself the gift of good health. Encourage older adults and their families to visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org for information on comprehensive diabetes control to help ensure a lifetime of good health.
  • Offer to appear on a local television or radio news or talk program to share information about diabetes and older adults, tied to the idea of giving a gift that will last a lifetime. For example, “It’s that time of year… and you’re probably struggling to find the perfect gift. Here’s an idea... give the gift of good health by helping your loved one manage their diabetes.” Promote signing up for medical nutrition therapy services or diabetes self-management training as a gift to yourself or an older family member with diabetes. Don’t forget to mention NDEP’s free resources!
  • Create a list of ten healthy holiday eating tips for older adults with diabetes.
  • Use healthy recipes for a bake sale at your church or synagogue and donate the proceeds to a diabetes research organization. Let local media know (via a media advisory) about your new twist on a traditional fundraising activity during the holiday season. For recipe ideas, visit the National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute’s “Heart-Healthy Recipes,”“A Healthier You” Recipes, or Fruits & Veggies Matter’s “Recipe Finder.”

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Additional Promotion Ideas

  • Partner with your local beauty salon or barber shop to offer a “Discount Day” for older adults in honor of The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Handscampaign. Hand out brochures and ask them to display NDEP posters in their windows and provide space for the community to promote upcoming health fairs.
  • Arrange for a local restaurant to serve a tasting menu of healthy food choices for older adults with diabetes. Send a media advisory to local media, and announce that this is in conjunction with NDEP’s Power to Controlcampaign.
  • Gather a group of older adults living with diabetes and offer interviews to local media to discuss how they learned to manage their disease.
  • Secure a table or booth at your local shopping mall and hand out Power to Control campaign materials about older adults and diabetes to shoppers.
  • Team up with your local hospital or health care professional to create a pocket guide of questions for older adults to ask their physicians about the Medicare-covered services for people with diabetes. Get a local print shop to donate copies to the effort, and disseminate them to pharmacies, libraries, and community centers.
  • Scout the airwaves for a high-profile local news anchor or radio personality who is an older adult with diabetes. Encourage that person to discuss the importance of Medicare’s diabetes self-management training or medical nutrition therapy services on the air.
  • Invite older adults in your community to contribute to a book of healthy recipes that you develop to share with others who have diabetes.
  • Ask local utility companies, public health departments, libraries, and private businesses to display Power to Control campaign materials in their lobbies, at their registration desks, or in their reception areas.
  • Invite supermarkets, fitness centers, restaurants, and retailers to place Power to Control materials at their cashier desks, registration desks, or information centers.
  • Work to have local hospitals, health clinics, and health care professional offices play NDEP’s radio or TV PSAs for patients or customers waiting in their lobby areas.
  • Send copies of print PSAs to local media that serve older adults, along with a fact sheet about diabetes and older adults. Include a letter encouraging media to run the PSAs to help spread the word about diabetes self-management.
  • Encourage pharmacies, grocery stores, clothing stores, and shoe stores to air NDEP’s radio PSAs over their audio system.
  • Ask your local grocery or drug store to place Power to Control materials in shopping or prescription bags for customers.
  • Places of worship can include Power to Control messages and NDEP contact information in service bulletins or on information tables.
  • Work with professional associations, community groups, and clubs to plan a community activity to help increase awareness about managing diabetes.
  • Ask local fire, police, and rescue departments to distribute Power to Control materials when they conduct fire-safety or crime-risk home checks for community residents.
  • Ask the manager at your local movie theater to promote the Power to Control campaign and NDEP’s contact information on the big screen before movies begin.
  • Contact your local Meals on Wheels program and ask if they could hand out NDEP tip sheets with their meals. For more information about making healthy food choices as an older adult, visit www.nutrition.gov.
  • Contact your local YMCA or community center to see if it offers physical activity classes for older adults. Ask if you can give a presentation about The Power to Controlcampaign to participants.
  • Learn more about diabetes in your area by contacting your state’s Diabetes Prevention & Control Program. Ask about ways your organization can partner with local diabetes prevention and control campaigns.

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Examples of Successful Promotional Activities

The National Diabetes Education Program has worked with community-based organizations to identify effective outreach and promotion strategies for reaching older adults of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds who have diabetes. Here are examples of what different organizations across the nation have done to promote diabetes awareness to older adult audiences.

Arizona Diabetes Coalition

The Arizona Diabetes Coalition (ADC) distributed NDEP materials about diabetes and Medicare benefits to nearly 7,000 health care professionals and older adult patients.

Target Audiences.ADC’s activities focused on two distinct target audiences—health care professionals from diverse disciplines and racial/ethnic backgrounds, and patients age 65 and older.

Partners. ADC was established by the Health Services Advisory Group and includes 90 Arizona health care organizations. Additional entities supported specific collaborative activities. Partners included the American Diabetes Association (ADA), pharmaceutical companies, and various health networks.

Promotional Activities.ADC’s activities focused on reaching health care professionals included:

  • distributing NDEP overview brochures and order forms at a quarterly partner meeting;
  • disseminating NDEP kits and other materials to health care professionals in Maricopa County, Ariz.;
  • making a presentation and disseminating Power to Controlmaterials to primary care physicians; and
  • sending press releases about Medicare diabetes benefits to newsletters and other publications of targeted professional medical associations and societies.

ADC activities targeting patients included:

  • distributing NDEP materials to managers at senior centers that provide educational and health promotion programs to approximately 10,000 older adults in Maricopa County;
  • teaming with the local chapter of ADA to launch a public relations campaign to increase awareness about diabetes and Medicare benefits among older adults and their families; and
  • disseminating NDEP messages and ADA guidelines to retiree members of the Southwest Health Alliance.

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Area Agency on Aging of Broward County, Fla.

The Area Agency on Aging of Broward County, Fla.disseminated information about managing diabetes and Medicare benefits to older adults from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and to the health care professionals who serve them.

Target Audiences. The primary target audience was adults age 60 or older, including low-income and minority populations. Secondary target audiences included health care and other professionals who serve these older adults.

Partners. Prominent partners in the NDEP pilot site effort included organizations with which the Area Agency on Aging had strong, existing relationships. These partners included members of the local health care community, including two public hospital districts in Broward County and various private hospitals; the county library system; local media; and faith-based and community organizations.

Promotional Activities. The Area Agency on Aging identified and took part in key public health education events that were already being planned in its area. Activities included:

  • speaking about NDEP and distributing Power to Controlmaterials at a professional diabetes workshop;
  • partnering with the North Broward Hospital District to staff an exhibit table and distribute Power to Controlbrochures at local health fairs and seminars;
  • distributing NDEP and other educational materials to promote health and wellness at a workshop on the Seminole Indian reservation;
  • staffing an exhibit booth and distributing NDEP brochures during an evening event at a local hospital;
  • presenting a seminar and distributing NDEP materials at the African American Research Library and Cultural Center; and
  • providing NDEP materials to support groups for people with diabetes with the help of partners such as Broward Meals on Wheels and a local medical center.

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Nevada Division for Aging Services

The Nevada Division for Aging Services(DAS) helped nearly 10,000 older adults access diabetes education materials and information about Medicare coverage benefits.

Target Audiences. The Nevada DAS developed strategic partnerships to reach target populations, particularly low-income, minority, older adults with diagnosed diabetes who used the Nevada Rural Health Centers, and older adults eligible for Medicare.

Partners. Because the Nevada campaign relied on volunteers and existing resources, acquiring additional resources through partners was critical to its success. The Nevada DAS recruited three key partners to help support its diabetes awareness and outreach efforts: the Lions Clubs, Nevada Drugs, and Raley’s Pharmacy. Other organizations that supported the campaign included state and county health programs and centers, local businesses, and universities.

Promotional Activities. The Nevada DAS delivered NDEP Power to Controlcampaign messages through the following activities:

  • Patient Surveillance and Information Dissemination—The Nevada DAS worked in tandem with the Nevada Diabetes Prevention and Control Program and the Nevada Rural Health Centers, Inc., to modify an existing state patient survey with questions about patient awareness and use of the Medicare diabetes self-monitoring benefit. Patients with Medicare who were identified during the survey process received Power to Controlcampaign materials.
  • Public Outreach—The Nevada DAS partnered with pharmacies and community groups to disseminate campaign messages and materials. DAS staff also made appearances on local television and radio programs and attended state and local meetings and conferences.
  • Professional Education—DAS staff received education and training in basic diabetes care and the Medicare benefits related to the disease. Training resources included educational materials developed for the Power to Controlcampaign.

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United Filipino American Senior Citizens of San Diego, Inc.

The United Filipino American Senior Citizens of San Diego, Inc. (UFASCSD) helped thousands of Filipino older adults access diabetes education materials and information about Medicare coverage benefits.

Target Audience. The primary audience of the UFASCSD campaign was Filipino Americans age 65 and older from the communities of National City, San Diego City, and Chula Vista. The campaign specifically targeted older adults who were eligible for Medicare benefits or received services through community organizations or programs.

Partners. UFASCSD recruited partners from Filipino professional, civic, and other organizations as well as local pharmacies, senior centers, and Lions Clubs.

Promotional Activities. Activities undertaken by UFASCSD and its partners included:

  • reaching people with Medicare through senior centers, community health clinics, church gatherings, and senior housing facilities;
  • providing physicians and caregivers with information about the Medicare self-monitoring benefit;
  • using local media to increase awareness of the Medicare benefits;
  • organizing community forums on the Medicare benefits for older adults; and
  • providing orientation and training about Medicare policies and diabetes management to older adults who could then pass information on to their peers.

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Lions Club International

At its international convention in 2006, Lions Clubs International launched the Strides: Lions Walk for Diabetes Awareness for their members, as an initiative to encourage Lions to organize high-visibility diabetes awareness walks in their communities. Participants received a Strides walk information kit, containing NDEP co-branded materials and a Lions “We Stride” commemorative pin. Since the program’s inception, numerous clubs have held Lions Strides walks.

Target Audience. Lions club members are encouraged to organize community Strides walks for family members, friends, neighbors, people with diabetes, and local health care professionals to promote diabetes education, self-management, and prevention. Lions organizing Strides walks are also encouraged to provide informational handouts to children and adults in attendance. The materials are co-branded NDEP resources, such as the Tips for Kids with Type 2 Diabetes, Diabetes Numbers At-a-Glance, and Take Care of Your Feet for a Lifetime.

Partners. Before organizing walks, Lions Club members are encouraged to:

  • Evaluate community needs. Does your community have a large “at-risk” population (persons who are elderly, overweight, or who belong to specific ethnic groups)? Is diabetes prevalent in the community? What is the best way to assist this population?
  • Partner with local diabetes organizations. Contact local government agencies, private diabetes foundations, or hospitals. Suggest forming a partnership for diabetes education programs or fundraisers.
  • Determine the best diabetes project for your community. Local health care regulations may affect your choice of diabetes awareness projects.
  • Outline a plan. Include procedures and costs involved in implementing the project. Submit the plan to your club for approval.
  • Refer to the Strides: Lions Walk for Diabetes Awareness Information Packet for guidelines in organizing and implementing a successful Strides walk.

Promotional Activities.

  • Lions Clubs International co-branded NDEP materials by adding its logo and includes a selection of tip sheets in the Strides Information Packet.
  • The Strides: Lions Walk for Diabetes Awareness webpage features NDEP as a resource and links to the NDEP website for further diabetes information and materials.
  • The Strides Information Packet and the Lions Clubs International website feature an order form for Lions to obtain additional NDEP co-branded materials.

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Tools to Implement Promotional Activities

Tips for Working with Media

Your local media is a great vehicle for reaching a large audience and relaying important messages about diabetes self-management in older adults. Here are a few general tips to help you work with your local media:

  • Determine your target audience. For example, are you trying to reach African American older adults, Hispanic/Latino older adults, caregivers of older adults, etc.? Find out which local media outlets reach that audience and would be most receptive to and interested in your story. Then, develop a list of contacts at local media outlets and keep it current. (See the section of this kit entitled Guidelines for Issuing a Media Advisory for more information on creating a media list.) Include local religious organizations, hospitals, and community service groups. Tell them your availability, explain your role and the type of information you can provide, and give them your contact information.

  • Offer information that is current, accurate, and includes audience appeal. Facts and personal stories are what make a news story. Review the campaign’s messages and use statistics about diabetes prevalence in your area to get the attention of your local media. Here are some examples:
    • Watch for national or local events related to diabetes and use them to create a story with a local angle.
    • Find a local older adult who has overcome obstacles to manage diabetes and ask him or her to speak about the experience in a media interview.
    • Plan and host a special diabetes-related event and enlist a guest speaker.

  • Find out whether your local print media outlets accept public service advertisements (PSAs) and send them NDEP’s print PSAs. Call newspapers and magazines and ask for a contact person for PSAs. Send an email to the contact and attach a copy of the PSA. Call the contact, urge them to run the PSA in their publication, and offer to provide a printer-ready version of the ad (available on NDEP’s website). Since all of NDEP’s materials are copy-right free, you can also add your own logo to any NDEP product, including PSAs. For more information, see NDEP’s logo use policy.

  • Contact public service directors at local radio stations and ask them to air NDEP’s recorded or live-read radio PSAs. Adapt the sample radio live-read scripts for your organization. Send the script to the public service director along with a cover letter. The cover letter describes the campaign and asks for the radio station’s support. Call the public service directors to confirm they’ve received the PSA script and tell them briefly why this campaign is so important. Follow-up calls can make all the difference!

  • If a reporter or editor has specific questions about diabetes or Medicare benefits that you do not feel comfortable answering, direct them to speak with a diabetes educator or other health care professional. Be concise, accurate, and honest with what you can and cannot answer. Most importantly, be professional, friendly, and creative!

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Sample Media Email

Subject: Local Program Addresses Diabetes among Older Adults

Dear [Name],

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. It affects an estimated 12.2 million older adults, or 23 percent of all people over age 60. These statistics make it increasingly important for our community to know that diabetes can be managed to lower the risk of serious complications. Here in [town], [name of organization], is [holding an event, planning a program, etc.] to help older adults in our community understand how they can avoid diabetes complications.

[Organization] and the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a federally sponsored initiative, are implementing an awareness campaign called The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands about the importance of diabetes self-management for older adults with diabetes and their loved ones.

[Organization] urges you to help us get the word out to our community about the importance of this campaign. I’d be happy to give you more information about what [organization] is doing to help promote this campaign in [community name] and the number of free resources available for older adults in our community. [If you have information about an event or program, list it here.] For more information, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org, or contact me at [phone number/email].
Thanks,

[Name]
[Title]
[Organization]
[Phone Number]
[Email Address]
For free diabetes information and materials,
call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) or click www.YourDiabetesInfo.org.

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Tips for Writing a Press Release

Many stories reported in the news have started with a well-written press release (also called a news release). Small newspapers will sometimes print the release verbatim or with minor changes. For the most part, however, media will use the information you provide as background for a story. The tips below will help you in writing a press release and in getting the information used.

  • Make sure you have a good reason for writing a press release.Press releases should be written if you have something newsworthy to say. For example, you might send out a press release if your organization does any of the following:
    • Plans local activities to coincide with an event or observed holiday or celebration.
    • Issues a proclamation with the mayor or other local politician.
    • Conducts a special program featuring a local or national speaker.
    • Releases the results of a study, poll, or survey.
    • Honors an individual or organization.
    • Launches a public education program or campaign.
    • Hires a high-level staff person or officer.

  • Keep it short. A press release is ideally one page long (no more than two pages) and should contain short sentences and paragraphs.

  • Use the proper format.At the top of the page on the left-hand side, include “For Immediate Release” or state that the information should be held for a specific date. At the top of the page on the right-hand side, include the name, phone number, and email address of the contact who can provide additional information and be available for follow-up media inquiries. If the release is more than one page, end page 1 with the notation “-more-.” The last paragraph of the release should include a “boilerplate,” which is a brief description of your organization and its mission. At the end of the release, follow the last sentence with the notation “# # #” centered on the line below.

  • Start with the most important information. Begin with a headline that provides a brief but interesting descriptive phrase to introduce the information that will be contained in your release. The headline is the attention grabber, which often makes the difference in whether or not it will be read. Also include a subhead underneath the headline. This gives you the opportunity to flesh out your angle and further hook the reporter. A good headline and subhead combination can make the difference between a press release that is read and exposed and one that is ignored.

  • The first 10 words of your release are the most important; make sure they are effective. The lead paragraph includes the who, what, when, where, and how of the story. If the reporter only reads the lead of a good press release, he or she should have everything they need to get started on a story.

  • Use clear, simple language. Never use slang, acronyms, or technical terms. If you must use an acronym or technical term, explain it. If using quotes, make sure to have them approved by your organization’s attributed spokesperson.

  • Accuracy and factuality are important.Be sure to verify spelling, names, titles, and statistics. For the latest national and state statistics on diabetes, go to www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/populations. Remember to avoid editorial comments. Opinions should only be expressed in direct quotes.

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Sample Press Release

[Your Organization/Company Logo]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: [Date]                        Contact: [Name, Phone Number, Email]

[Company Name] Joins National Program to Help Older Adults Manage Their Diabetes
More than [number] [state] older adults have diabetes

[City, State][Organization/company name] announced today that it has joined a nationwide effort to help older adults with diabetes learn how to manage their disease. More than 12 million adults over the age of 60 have diabetes nationwide, millions more have yet to be diagnosed, and thousands of new cases are reported each year. The number of Americans with diabetes is expected to double by 2050.

The campaign, called The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands, stresses the importance of managing diabetes and preventing complications from the disease among older adults. Testing and controlling blood glucose (blood sugar) levels is one of the most critical components of diabetes self-management. A comprehensive approach also includes managing blood pressure and cholesterol, taking prescribed medications, and making healthy lifestyle choices such as following a healthy eating plan and engaging in regular physical activity.

The campaign also includes information on benefits for Medicare patients that can help pay for diabetes supplies and services. Diabetes self-management training teaches people with diabetes how to manage their blood glucose, make appropriate food choices, be physically active, and prevent and treat complications. Medical nutrition therapy services, in which a registered dietitian or other nutrition professional reviews personal eating habits, gives tips on how to make healthy food choices, explains how to manage lifestyle factors that affect food choices, and checks progress with follow-up visits. Each of the two benefits must be prescribed by a physician.

The Power to Control education campaign, aimed at those age 60 and older with diabetes and their families and caregivers, provides information and messages using articles in publications, web resources, and community events from the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) —a joint program of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Providing additional information are the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Administration on Aging, both of which lead a nationwide network of state and area agencies that provide essential services to older adults and their caregivers.

- more -


[Company Name] Joins National Program – Page 2 of 2

“Older adults, many of whom are on fixed incomes, can find the cost of supplies and services needed to manage their diabetes overwhelming,” said [spokesperson]. “Through the National Diabetes Education Program’s Power to Control campaign, we can effectively teach older adults with diabetes how to manage their disease and how to improve the quality of their life.”

For more information about the Power to Control campaign, please contact [name] at [phone number] or [email address]. To learn more about the National Diabetes Education Program, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337).

# # #

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Guidelines for Issuing a Media Advisory

What is a media advisory?

A media advisory is a document that provides broadcast and print media reporters with the information needed to cover an event or activity (media advisories can also be referred to as media alerts). A media advisory is the best way to inform media outlets about an upcoming press conference or press briefing. The difference between a media advisory and a press release is that a media advisory tells reporters and editors about a newsworthy event that could create an opportunity for photo or video coverage.

Here are some suggestions that will help you successfully distribute your media advisory:

  • Send your media advisory to daybooks and “upcoming” or “week-ahead” columns.Look for a phone listing for a news wire service in your city or state. Wire services include organizations such as the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI). Ask to speak to someone handling the daybook—a service that the wire services provide to media. The daybook provides a daily listing of all events and activities that are open to media. Ask the daybook desk person to place your media advisory on the daybook the week before, the day before, and the day of the event. Remember to ask for the daybook editor’s name and fax number or email so that you can promptly get the information to the wire service.

  • Create a media list.Also send the media advisory to local media. One to two weeks before the event is the best time to email or fax your advisory. To get started, develop a current media list. Your list should be up-to-date in order to be effective in reaching reporters and getting them interested in your event.

Here’s how to get your list organized:

  • Check your local library or bookstore for media directories. Media directories provide you with a list of wire services, television stations, radio stations, daily and weekly newspapers, business trade publications, magazines, newsletters, and online news services, as well as contacts at these outlets. Check your area phonebook and search online to make sure your list is complete. Additionally, some commonly recognized online subscription services include Cision MediaSource® and BurrellesLuce media directories.

  • Arrange your list so you can view key information at-a-glance. Organize your list by the reporter’s or editor’s name, media organization, their specific “beat” or focus of interest, phone number, email address, and fax number.

  • When identifying media to include on your list, do not forget specialty media. Look for print and broadcast outlets that specifically target older adults, African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and other minority populations. Other media you should put on your list include daily and weekly community newspapers and newsletters; publications, such as those written for teachers or health care professionals; business publications produced by hospitals and health centers; and religious publications, such as those published by churches and synagogues.

  • Check to be sure you are targeting the appropriate reporter or editor for your event (i.e., a reporter who focuses on older adult issues). Find out when the best time is to call and follow up with that person. You should also find out how far in advance they would like the information about your event.

  • Create a final media list. For each media contact, note the best time of day and how far in advance you should call about your event, as well as their preference for how they receive information (e.g., fax vs. email).

Here are some tips for following up:

  • After you have sent your media advisory, contact reporters or editors by phone or email to find out if they plan to cover the event. Sometimes getting in touch personally can make a difference in creating media interest. However, only make one follow-up call unless they specifically ask you to contact them again.
  • Avoid contacting journalists during deadlines. Since most newspapers are morning editions, the best time to reach a newspaper journalist is from 10:00 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday. Avoid following up on Fridays.
  • If you do connect with a reporter over the phone, ask first if it is a good time to talk, since he or she may be on deadline. If not, find out what day and time is more convenient.
  • Greet media that attends your event and let them know that you (or an appointed spokesperson) are available for follow-up questions.

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Sample Media Advisory

[Title and Name of Spokesperson] and [Name of Your Organization] Join Forces for Diabetes Awareness Campaign

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: [Date]
Contact: [Name of person who will handle media inquiries, phone number, email]

[Spokesperson], [title] or
[Name of your organization’s representative],[title], [city or state] or
[Names, titles, affiliations of other participants] or
[Name and city of a person with diabetes who is participating in the event, if applicable]

Date:[Day and date]

Time:[Time of the event]

Place:[Address where event will be held, including any important location information (e.g., room name or number, parking instructions)]

Contact:[Name of the person who will handle phone inquiries from the public]

Phone/Email:[Contact person’s phone number and email address]

[Title and name of spokesperson] and [name of your organization] have joined forces in support of a national diabetes awareness campaign for older adults called The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands, sponsored by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP). NDEP is a joint program of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Highlights of the local campaign include [a seminar? benefit concert? List the special event or the most noteworthy aspect of the campaign] by [spokesperson] on [date] at the [venue] in [area].

[Spokesperson] will [for example, discuss his or her own experiences managing diabetes]. [Describe the spokesperson again (e.g., a musical legend, an award-winning journalist)], is well known for [list expertise, major accomplishments, knowledge of diabetes, etc.].

The Power to Control campaign was developed to reach older adults over age 60 with messages about the importance of diabetes self-management and available Medicare benefits. Although diabetes and its complications occur in Americans of all ages and racial and ethnic groups, older adults are more commonly affected. Many older adults with diabetes are on fixed incomes that make it difficult for them to follow all recommended self-care routines. For more information about the Power to Control campaign and this event, please contact [name] at [phone number] or [email address].

# # #

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Tips for Placing a Community Health Event Announcement in a Newspaper

Here are some tips for placing a community health event in a newspaper:

  • Begin the process of trying to get your event published approximately two to three weeks before you want it to appear in the publication.

  • To get started, identify the procedures for getting event information into newspaper and calendar listings. Call the paper and find out the name of the person you need to speak with about submitting an event. Find out if the paper has any rules about how an event is submitted and how far in advance to submit the item. Usually, event information is sent to the Calendar & Events editor. Ask if the editor prefers to receive information via email or fax.

  • Send a brief letter that explains who you are, and provide some background information about the National Diabetes Education Program and the topic of your event. The letter should briefly and clearly state the topic and purpose of the event.

  • A few days after you have sent information about your event, call the publication and make sure it was received. Be prepared to answer any questions about your event such as event location and registration, and use the call as an opportunity to once again express your interest in seeing the event appear in the publication.

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Guidelines for Ordering NDEP Materials for Community Health Events

NDEP encourages you to use its free diabetes education materials at your next community health event and to feature NDEP campaigns, messages, and materials at your exhibit table or booth. All materials may be downloaded, reproduced, and distributed without copyright restrictions. Feel free to duplicate and disseminate as many copies of these materials as desired. Here’s some information to help you get started.

How do I order NDEP materials?

Many materials can be ordered in quantities as large as 200 copies, and the first 25 copies of most materials are free. The NDEP Publication Order Form addresses the quantity available for each NDEP material. Additionally, commercial printer-ready CDs are available for most materials. You can provide these CDs directly to a printer as is, or add your organization’s logo and contact information. To order printer-ready CDs for a specific NDEP material, call the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse at 1-800-860-8747.

Remember that single copies of materials are free. Shipping and handling fees are included in the price of all materials. Please allow three to five weeks for delivery. Bulk orders must be prepaid in U.S. dollars in form of a check, money order, purchase order, or credit card. You may also send a U.S. Postal Money Order or a check instead of using a credit card. However, personal checks will delay your order as the clearinghouse must wait for your funds to clear before any merchandise is shipped. Please allow an additional seven to 10 business days.

Order online by visiting NDEP’s online publications catalog at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/publications/index.aspx and follow these steps:

  1. Browse the publication(s) available from the NDEP catalog.
  2. Select the desired quantity from the drop-down menu.
  3. Click “Add to Cart” to order from the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Note: To order multiple publications, click the “Back” button in your browser, and repeat Step 3 (above) for each publication desired.
  4. To complete your order, click “Check Out” on the NDIC website, and enter all information before clicking “Submit.”

NDEP also has an online Spanish-language publications catalog available.

Order by phone by calling 1-888-693-NDEP (6337). Both English and Spanish-speaking consumers can order materials from this number.

Order by online form by filling the order form and completing the required fields.

What if someone at a community health event would like to order more NDEP materials?

Anyone can order NDEP materials. If you’re afraid you might run out of materials at an event, make copies of the NDEP Publications Order Form to hand out. Event participants can then use the form to order more materials on their own.

NDEP materials are copyright-free, but what about logos?

NDEP logoThe NDEP logo appears on all NDEP products and materials. Individuals and organizations are encouraged to reprint the materials and add their own logo. Products and materials that are not developed by or in partnership with NDEP should not display the NDEP logo.


Control Your Diabetes. For Life. logoSmall Steps Big Rewards. Prevent type 2 Diabetes logoNDEP’s campaign logos are also copyright-free and can be downloaded for use. Logos are available in three different resolutions:

  • 72 dots per inch (dpi) is low resolution, GIF format, and appropriate for web pages
  • 150 dpi is medium resolution, RGB TIFF format, and appropriate for color laser printers and newspaper printing
  • 300 dpi is high resolution, RGB TIFF format, and appropriate for professionally printed magazine ads and other publications. Most print publications prefer images that are at least 300 dpi.

Feel free to download these campaign logos and use them and NDEP materials during community health exhibits or conferences. You can even take these logos to a professional office or print center and have them incorporate NDEP campaign information onto banners or other public displays.

For more information, see NDEP’s logo use policy.

Where can I go for additional diabetes education materials?

Visit the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse for more diabetes education materials at www.catalog.niddk.nih.gov. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Diabetes Translation has additional diabetes education materials available at www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/.

You might also want to talk to your state Diabetes Prevention & Control Program, regional office of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or local Area Agency on Aging to find additional resources for an event.

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Power to Control Campaign Resources

The Power To Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands brochure coverThe Power To Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands Brochure


El poder de controlar la diabetes está en sus manos brochure coverEl poder de controlar la diabetes está en sus manos Brochure


What You Need to Know About Medicare and Diabetes article cover“What You Need to Know About Medicare and Diabetes” Sample Feature Article


The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands adsThe Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands Print PSAs

  • Black and white print ads in full-page, ½ page, ¼ page, and ⅛ page sizes

The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands radio scriptThe Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands Live Read Radio PSAs


Power to Control newsletter text coverPower to Control Newsletter Text


Power to Control talking points for community presentations coverPower to Control Talking Points for Community Presentations


Power to Control Campaign Community powerpoint presentationPower to Control Campaign Community Presentation

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Power to Control Newsletter Text

NDEP encourages you to help promote the Power to Control campaign by featuring the sample newsletter text below in online and print publications.

Sample Newsletter Text

Free Diabetes Information for Older Adults

Self-management is an important component of any successful diabetes management plan. The National Diabetes Education Program’s The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands campaign educates older adults about the importance of checking their blood glucose levels, managing the ABCs of diabetes, and how to access Medicare benefits that help pay for diabetes equipment, supplies, and additional training with a healthcare professional. Campaign brochures are available in both English and Spanish and can be downloaded or ordered for free at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or by calling 1-888-693-NDEP (6337). The National Diabetes Education Program is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 partner organizations.

Free Diabetes Community Outreach Materials

This online resource provides information about diabetes in older adults and suggests how to promote the National Diabetes Education Program’s The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands campaign through educational activities and promotional events. Kit materials help convey the importance of comprehensive diabetes control and the fact that diabetes can be managed to both media and your community. The kit also contains information about the many Medicare benefits available to older adults with diabetes. To download a free copy of the kit and more information about diabetes, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo.org. The National Diabetes Education Program is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 partner organizations.

Printer-Ready Graphics

Further promote the Power to Control campaign by downloading copyright-free NDEP campaign logos to accompany newsletter text.

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Power to Control Talking Points for Community Presentations

NDEP Contact Information: www.YourDiabetesInfo.org; 1-888-693-NDEP (6337)

Key Messages to Highlight During Interview

  • Diabetes is a serious, common, and costly, yet controllable and preventable disease.
  • More than 12 million adults aged 60 and older have diabetes in the U.S.
  • The National Diabetes Education Program has a campaign tailored specifically for older adults that outlines the important steps older adults can take to manage their diabetes called The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands.
  • If you have diabetes, follow these four key steps to live a long, active life:
    1. Learn about diabetes. The National Diabetes Education Program offers free diabetes resources tailored for older adults to help them understand that diabetes is a serious disease that affects almost every part of the body.
    2. Know your diabetes ABCs (A1C, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol) to reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and other diabetes-related complications.
    3. Manage your diabetes. Work with your health care team to reach your ABC goals and to start a self-care plan.
    4. Get routine care to avoid problems. See your health care team at least twice a year to find and treat any problems early.
  • Medicare pays for part of the cost of your diabetes equipment and supplies as well as other benefits, including diabetes self-management training, medical nutrition therapy services, eye and foot exams, etc.

Key Statistics

  • Nearly 24 million Americans – almost 8 percent of the population – have diabetes.
  • 23 percent of Americans age 60 or older have diabetes – that’s more than 12 million older adults.
  • Factors that have contributed to the increase in diabetes:
    1. People with diabetes are living longer, which affects the prevalence rates.
    2. There are more people in the “higher risk groups” such as older adults and those of certain ethnic groups, such as African Americans.
    3. Unhealthy lifestyles, such as not being physically active and not making healthy food choices, have led to increased overweight and obesity, which are risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

Four Key Steps to Managing Your Diabetes

  1. Learn about diabetes.
    • You may have heard people say they have “a touch of diabetes” or “your sugar is a little high.” These words suggest that diabetes is not a serious disease. That is not correct. Diabetes is serious, but you can learn to manage it.
    • Diabetes means that your blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not make or use insulin well. People with type 2 diabetes often need to take pills or insulin to help manage their blood glucose.
    • If you manage your diabetes, it can help you feel better and stay healthy. Keeping your blood glucose close to normal lowers your chances of having heart, eye, kidney, and nerve disease.
    • All people with diabetes need to make healthy food choices, stay at a healthy weight, and be physically active every day.

  2. Know your diabetes ABCs (A1C, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol).
    • People with diabetes are at high risk for having a heart attack and stroke. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for people with diabetes. In fact, 2 out of 3 people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke.
    • The A1C test measures your average blood glucose level over the past three months. Have your A1C level checked at least twice a year. The goal for most people with diabetes is an A1C below 7.
    • High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard. Have your blood pressure checked at each visit with a health care professional. The goal for most people with diabetes is below 130/80.
    • LDL, or bad cholesterol, builds up and clogs your arteries. Have your health care professional check your cholesterol at least once a year. The LDL goal for most people is less than 100.

  3. Manage your diabetes.
    • Work with your health care team to develop a diabetes meal plan to help you make healthy food choices. Visit your local senior center to meet people at lunch who may share your interest in learning more about the importance of eating healthy.
    • Get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. Brisk walking is a great way to move more.
    • Stay at a healthy weight by using your meal plan and moving more.
    • If you smoke, get help to quit.
    • Take your medications even when you feel good.

  4. Get routine care to avoid problems. See your health care team at least twice a year to find and treat any complications early.
    1. At each visit, be sure to have a blood pressure check, foot check, weight check, and a review of your self-care plan.
    2. At least two times a year, have an A1C test. It may be checked more often if it’s over 7.
    3. Once a year, be sure to have a cholesterol test, triglyceride test (a type of blood fat), complete foot exam, dental exam to check teeth and gums, dilated eye exam, flu shot, and urine and blood test to check for kidney problems.
    4. Once a year, get a flu shot.
    5. Record this information and your goal for good diabetes self-management and keep information at home to keep a record of any changes.

Medicare Benefits for People with Diabetes

  • Medicare helps pay for diabetes self-testing equipment and supplies, including blood glucose meters, test strips, and lancets.
  • Medicare covers diabetes self-management training and medical nutrition therapy services.
  • Medicare also helps pay for other services for people with diabetes who have Medicare Part B. Ask your health care team about obtaining these services: A1C test, dilated eye exam to check for diabetic eye diseases, glaucoma screening, flu shot, and pneumococcal pneumonia shot
  • Medicare Part B covers diabetes screening tests for certain people who are at risk for diabetes. People at risk for diabetes may have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, or a history of high blood glucose. Medicare allows up to two screenings a year.
  • For more information about Medicare’s coverage of diabetes screening, supplies, and self-management training, call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or visit www.medicare.gov.

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NDEP Contact Info

To learn more about diabetes self-management, contact the National Diabetes Education Program at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org or call 1-888-693-NDEP (6337) and download or order free copies of The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Handsand 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes. For Life. brochures.


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Power to Control Campaign Community Presentation

The following slides sets contain information about the Power to Control campaign and can be used by area leaders to train and inform the other members of their community about how they can use NDEP’s free materials to promote the importance of comprehensive diabetes management. Slides can be downloaded as an entire presentation or used individually.

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Additional Resources

Free Government Educational Resources for Older Adults

For free information about Medicare coverage of diabetes supplies and other types of Medicare services, contact:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227), available in English and Spanish
1-877-486-2048 for TTY users
1-800-HHS-TIPS (1-800-447-8477) to report Medicare fraud and abuse
www.medicare.gov
www.medicare.gov/caregivers/

For more information about diabetes and older adults, contact:

National Diabetes Education Program
1-888-693-NDEP (1-888-693-6337), available in English and Spanish
1-866-569-1162 for TTY users
www.YourDiabetesInfo.org
www.diabetesinformacion.org (en español)

Administration on Aging
1-202-619-0724
www.aoa.gov

American Association of Diabetes Educators
1-800-338-3633
www.diabeteseducator.org

American Diabetes Association
1-800-DIABETES (1-800–342–2383)
www.diabetes.org

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
1-800-877-1600
www.eatright.org

American Heart Association
1-800-AHA-USA1 (1-800–242–8721)
www.heart.org

American Society on Aging
1-800-537-9728
www.asaging.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
1-877-CDC-INFO (1-877-232-4636)
www.cdc.gov/diabetes/
www.cdc.gov/aging/

For a list of CDC-funded State Diabetes Prevention and Control Programs, visit www.cdc.gov/diabetes/states/

EyeCare America
A public service foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology
www.eyecareamerica.org
To determine qualification for no cost medical eye exams and eye care, call 1-800-222-EYES (3937)

Indian Health Services
1-505-248-4182
www.ihs.gov/MedicalPrograms/Diabetes/

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging
1-800-33-NAPCA (1-800-336-2722)
National Multilingual Toll-free Helpline Numbers:
Chinese: 1-800-582-4218
Korean: 1-800-582-4259
Vietnamese: 1-800-582-4336
www.napca.org

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
1-202-872-0888
www.n4a.org

For information and referral to community-based services for older adults, contact the Eldercare Locator at (1-800-677-1116) or www.eldercare.gov.

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
1-800-860-8747
www.diabetes.niddk.nih.gov

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
1-301-592-8573
www.nhlbi.nih.gov

National Hispanic Council on Aging
1-202-347-9733
www.nhcoa.org

National Indian Council on Aging
1-505-292-2001
www.nicoa.org

National Institute on Aging
1-301-496-1752
www.nia.nih.gov

For health information for older adults from the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine, visit www.nihseniorhealth.gov.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
1-301-496-3583
www.niddk.nih.gov

National Kidney Disease Education Program
1-866-4-KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639)
www.nkdep.nih.gov

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Carolyn Leontos, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., Nutrition Specialist, University of Nevada, Reno, Cooperative Extension and Linda Haas, Ph.C., R.N., C.D.E., Endocrinology Clinical Nurse
Specialist, Department of Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle Division, reviewed this kit for scientific and medical accuracy.

Many thanks to NDEP’s Older Adult Work Group for their review of materials in this kit:

  • American Association of Diabetes Educators
  • American Dietetic Association
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
  • Lions Club International
  • Medicare Diabetes Screening Project
  • Minnesota Diabetes Prevention and Control Program
  • National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs
  • National Council on Aging
  • National Indian Council on Aging
  • Office of Women’s Health
  • Veterans Health Administration

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the support of more than 200 partner organizations.

www.YourDiabetesInfo.org
1-888-693-NDEP (6337); TTY: 1-866-569-1162

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Let Us Hear From You

It is NDEP’s hope that you will find this online kit to be a valuable tool in your efforts to spread the important message of diabetes self-management to older adults with diabetes and their families. Feel free to send us your success stories, photos, or examples of media coverage. Let us know what worked, what didn’t, and how we can improve this kit. Your feedback will help shape future materials to be included in the Power to Control campaign.

If you have additional comments or questions, please contact:

Joanne Gallivan, M.S., R.D.
Director, National Diabetes Education Program
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Building 31, Room 9A0631
Center Drive, MSC 2560
Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
Phone: 1-301-496-3583
Fax: 1-301-496-7422
joanne_gallivan@nih.gov

Rachel Weinstein, M.Ed.
Deputy Director, National Diabetes Education Program
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Building 31, Room 9A0631
Center Drive, MSC 2560
Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
Phone: 1-301-496-3583
Fax: 1-301-496-7422
rachelwe@niddk.nih.gov

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