CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  NIDDK - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

NDEP is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and more than 200 public and private organizations.

About Diabetes HealthSense

Nearly 26 million Americans—over eight percent of the U.S. population—are living with diabetes. About 79 million more adults have prediabetes. Even more people are at risk for the disease due to overweight or obesity, family history, age, race, and/or ethnicity. Children are also affected by diabetes, especially as rates of childhood obesity rise.

Diabetes is a serious disease, but the complications of diabetes can be prevented or delayed by keeping blood glucose levels under control. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or controlled by taking steps to lose a small amount of weight and getting at least 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week. Learn more about diabetes.

Many people know what to do to improve their health; it’s figuring out how to do it that’s challenging. For example, you may know that being active can help you lose weight and lower your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. But do you know how to become more active in your daily life and keep it up over time? The resources in Diabetes HealthSense can help you learn how to make changes to live well.

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s in Diabetes HealthSense?
Who is Diabetes HealthSense for?
What criteria must my resource meet in order to be included?
Are resources in Diabetes HealthSense reviewed for health literacy?
Who reviews the resources?
Submit a Resource
How long does the review process take?
Will I be notified of the result of the review?
My resource is included in Diabetes HealthSense. How can I promote it?
Are the videos on the Diabetes HealthSense homepage available for download?

What’s in Diabetes HealthSense?

The National Diabetes Education Program’s (NDEP) Diabetes HealthSense is designed to provide people with diabetes, people at risk for the disease and those who care for them with easy access to useful tools and programs that exist within the public domain and facilitate the behavior change process. The research articles in Diabetes HealthSense are a selection of review articles, landmark studies and meta-analyses on the science of behavior change and psychological health that promote the practical application of these strategies. To be included, resources must clearly address how to implement and sustain changes in behavior, be accessible to the public and contain limited or no advertising of commercial products.

Diabetes HealthSense also links to about 40 articles and studies on behavior change science and psychological health.

Linking to Non-government Resources

The graphic notice (External Web Site Policy Icon (Sample)) on some Diabetes HealthSense resources means that you are leaving the NDEP Diabetes HealthSense (NIH) website and entering a non-federal website. Reference to these links, products, services, or information does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), or any associated agencies or employees. Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by NIH or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site. You will be subject to the destination site’s privacy policy when you follow the link.

Who is Diabetes HealthSense for?

Diabetes HealthSense is for

  • People who want to make lifestyle changes to improve their health
  • People with diabetes
  • People with prediabetes
  • People who are at risk for diabetes
  • Family members, friends, and caregivers of people with diabetes
  • Health care professionals
  • Teachers and school health professionals
  • Community health workers
  • Community organizations

What criteria must my resource meet in order to be included?

All resources in Diabetes HealthSense are reviewed by independent experts on the behavior change process. Once accepted, resources are reviewed every two years to ensure relevance.

To be included in Diabetes HealthSense, resources must

  • Clearly address how to make and sustain lifestyle changes such as eating healthier, moving more, managing weight, coping with stress and emotions, or setting goals and can help a person with a chronic disease, such as diabetes, improve their health.
  • Be accessible to the public (may require registration and/or reasonable cost)
  • Contain limited or no advertising
  • Be user-friendly

Are resources in Diabetes HealthSense reviewed for health literacy?

There are not any specific requirements regarding health literacy or reading levels applied to resources included in Diabetes HealthSense. All resources are reviewed for behavior change criteria; reading levels may vary among Diabetes HealthSense resources.

Who reviews the resources?

Independent experts on the behavior change process review the resources included in Diabetes HealthSense on a voluntary basis.

We thank the following people for giving their time and knowledge for this project. Without their help, Diabetes HealthSense would not be possible:

Barbara J. Anderson, PhD
Ronny Bell, PhD
Denise Charron-Prochownik, PhD, RN
Richard Rubin, PhD, CDE
Martha Funnell, MS, RN, CDE
Michael Harris, PhD, MS
Nancy Houston Miller, RN, BSN
Christine Hunter, PhD, ABPP
M. Kaye Kramer, RN, MPH, DrPH, CCRC
David Marrero, PhD
Shelagh Ann Mulvaney, PhD

Robin Nwankwo, MPH, RD, CDE
Sandra Parker, RD, CDE
Russell Rothman, MD
Cecilia Sauter, MS, RD, CDE
Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD
Tricia Tang, PhD
O. Fahina Tavake-Pasi, MS
María Ureña, RN, MHA/MSN, FNP
Michael Vallis, PhD, RPsych
Jing Wang, PhD, MPH, MSN, RN

Submit a Resource

If you’d like to submit a resource for review, please complete the submission form and send it to ndep@mail.nih.gov or fax it to (202) 842-4032.

Hardcopies of resources can be mailed to:

NDEP Diabetes HealthSense Submissions
c/o Hager Sharp
1030 15th Street, NW, Suite 600E
Washington, DC 20005

How long does the review process take?

The review process is done periodically.- To check on the status of your submission, please contact NDEP via the “Contact Us” page.

Will I be notified of the result of the review?

Yes. If you’ve submitted a resource or research article, you will be contacted upon completion of the review.

My resource is included in Diabetes HealthSense. How can I promote it?

The NDEP has developed a variety of promotional tools for Diabetes HealthSense. Below is suggested text for promoting your resource and Diabetes HealthSense in your organization’s newsletter, through social media channels, or on your website:

[Your resource] from [your organization] has been included in the National Diabetes Education Program’s Diabetes HealthSense, an online library of resources for supporting behavior change for people to live well with diabetes or those at risk. Find this and other resources at www.YourDiabetesInfo.org/HealthSense.

Please note: inclusion of and reference to your resource does not constitute an endorsement by the NDEP, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or any associated agencies or employees.

Are the videos on the Diabetes HealthSense homepage available for download?

Yes, the videos on the Diabetes HealthSense homepage and others from the NDEP can be viewed or downloaded from the resources section of the NDEP website and the NDEP YouTube channel.

Contact Us

If you have a question, comment, or would like to report a technical difficulty with this site, please contact us at ndep@mail.nih.gov.